Thursday, May 26, 2005

Appam, aebleskiver or kanom krok

On one of the foodie sites, I came across this discussion about a Danish pancake ball called Aebleskiver. They are made in a cast iron pan that resembles a muffin tin that looks like this



Looking at this pan, surprisingly led me to this discovery. The pan is nothing but an appam or paniyaram mold that is used in South India to make similar fritters. Here is mine:

Some research revealed other interesting insights. Kanom Krok is a Thai version of appam. It is made similarly with rice flour and coconut but it has a filling of some sort. I just happen to feel that these dough balls originated in Thailand and traveled to South India. I am wondering if there is a version of this in Sri Lanka too since all these parts have a lot of similarity in climate and religious beliefs.

I find all this study of how foods evolved really thought provoking since they also represent change in government and religion that happened around that period. May be the corrupted, westernized versions of South Asian foods we are served at restaurants will evolve into legitimate dishes with their unique identities. I wonder if anyone still knows the stories behind ethnic dishes like aebleskiver, kanom krok or appam.

8 comments:

  1. Mika, You know, I have same kind of cast iron pan, we use it to prepare Ponganaalu(thick dosa batter with lots of other ingredients).

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  2. We call that paniyaram or vellai appam. It is very tasty. Mostly I use the mold for making sweet appams with jaggery and banana during festivals.

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  3. hiya Mika
    it reminds me of takoyaki pan! But sweet appams sound just as yummy!

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  4. Wow, this reminds me of the savory appams my mom makes!
    I love idlis and dosas but I don't have a food processor that can grind rice and ural dal to the required consistency. Any ideas?

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  5. Nupur- I used a blender earlier and it worked just fine. I don't think a processor would grind smooth enough.

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  6. This looks exactly like the pan used to make Unniappam in Kerala ; a delicious mildly sweet batter that is deepfried. Thank you for bringing back such fond memories.

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  7. Use blendtec for blending dosa batter. I have been using for a while and it is mess free and gives excellent texture..

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  8. Use blendtec for blending dosa batter. I have been using for a while and it is mess free and gives excellent texture..

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